Desicions about chemotherapy

24th August 2015: Sydney, Australia
Today, I made contact with a young person who is also overseen by my Professor. The young person had a reoccurrence of Adrenal Cancer (ACC) that spread to his lungs, however, now, approximately five years since finishing a course of Mitotane (chemotherapy for ACC), he is completing his first year at University. It is excellent to hear he is pursuing his studies, especially after being forced to face the journey at such a young age.

Interestingly, the conversation left me more confused about what actions to pursue in the future, namely, whether the course of Mitotane should continue. The young person had strong negative views about the drug, labelling it as a pesticide. Honestly, there is no surprise about his views after hearing the difficulty he endured over the period of 18 months. In terms of my own body, it is a decision I need to make, and whilst seemingly appearing to continue living without major disturbances from any side-effects, there appears to be a safety net associated with taking the drug. There is some irony in seeing the drug as a safety net, especially when bearing in mind my levels were so high, they were actually within a range deemed toxic before the Cancer resurfaced. The question surely becomes why is it viewed a safety net, especially when little success was achieved? I believe the matter could be debated long and hard, particularly being aware a lot of people would proclaim the drugs may be detrimental to my immune system and overall capacity to heal. In response, the only point coming to mind is the thought of not giving myself every opportunity to life should the drugs discontinue.

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Hospital is becoming a too familiar environment

2nd August 2015: Sydney, Australia

My eyes opened this morning to the type of pain I have come to understand requires immediate attention. I opted to attend the local hospital, opposed to being naive, and simply numbing the pain with medication. Luckily, to my relief scans revealed the pain stemmed from a small collection of fluid and internal bleeding, a fairly typical outcome for the surgery. On reflection, I possibly overreacted, however, the peace of mind is priceless. Furthermore, the circumstances reinforced the need to cease current attempts at weaning off my pain-relief medication.

As noted yesterday, I commenced a course of Cannabis Oil as a means of working I’m conjunction with my Chemotherapy to ensure I remain Cancer free, and currently it seems there are other advantages in taking the oil. Most notably, the alertness remaining in my thinking and interactions throughout the day. Moreover, I am not feeling heavily sedated or having a sense of loosing a degree of control over my behaviours and actions. Obviously, I acknowledge it is very early in my three month trial, and the primary goal will be difficult to gauge, however, admittedly, I am very pleased with the outcomes thus far, and hope for similar feelings to be experienced over the coming months. To conclude, I would encourage those to comment on my recent decision, regardless of whether they agree or disagree. Personally, the most important aspect of this is to connect with others to hopefully support others who are yet to face the battle some of have already encountered.