How to help a friend addicted to drugs

15th December 2015: Sydney, Australia

I am feeling extremely pleased to be anonymous, especially bearing in mind the topic of the post. Prior to continuing though, I must share my awareness of people possibly drawing some contradictions in my writing. Most notably, how I have detailed my beliefs about the benefits for people who with Cancer using Cannabis Oil. My reasoning results from seeing the divide caused within my small audience when writing about Cannabis. In response, I can only highlight the fact of not touching any Cannabis for over a decade before trailing it as a means to support my health whilst utilising it to eliminate the side effects associated with my chemotherapy. Basically, my use of Cannabis is solely centred upon supporting my quality of life and survival. In contrast, drugs such as ice take a person into a completely different direction.

I am not going to detail the circumstances for my friend or provide a case summary about his life. Instead, I want to share some thoughts, and hopefully receive some tips from others who are either experiencing similar matters or had encounters in the past that they feel will help someone else.

Naturally, the lives of my friend and I have shifted in different paths of late, and each time his name is raised, a cause of worry surfaces about his latest antics. The question has always been, what can be down to help him, especially if he does not wish to help himself. When reflecting on that statement, I wonder whether it is not signal of the circumstances being too hard too deal with? If true, it seems people, including myself have chosen to ignore the situation, placing his life in a context of ‘being out of sight out of mind’. Today, my thoughts have been about the type of friend I have been to him. Yes, he is addicted to an extremely dangerous drug, however, is it not these times for friends to rise in unity? Fortunately, another close friend in my social circle cares about our mutual friend, and arranged to meet last night. In all honesty. I am not sure whether it was helpful, however, a few small outcomes were achieved:
1. A show of willingness from old friends to support him.
2. The sharing of stories, highlighting the fact that a different life is possible.
3. Reconnection with a world outside addiction and crime.
4. Future planning to meet, showing a commitment to see him in the future.
5. Advice on some criminal matters he is involved in.

I am sure we can explore this topic in great depth, however, in accordance with keeping posts rather small, I hope the post can stimulate some thinking, and lead to some discussion on the matter.

Complete intoxication is not the right coping mechanism

29th June 2015: Sydney, Australia

I once made reference to a quote stating, “some people in the world need a tap on their shoulder to make changes in their lives”. Initially I played with the phrase, adjusting it to my own circumstances by adding, “some people in the world need a tap on their shoulder to make changes in their lives whilst others needing a gigantic push”. Now, I pose the question of what happens if nether the tap or push is sufficient to lead to sustainable change? Does it then just signal no other chances at living will be provided? I ask these questions following a night of behaviours and lifestyle choices I thought had been in my past. Just to note, I am not referring to anything malicious. Rather, complete and utter intoxication over a period of two days. Interestingly, it happened in the midst of all this waiting. I ponder whether some significance is associated with the decision? If so, will the direction be an inevitable death at a much earlier age than I ever hoped? Alternatively, will it be a moment, recognised as a coping mechanism, implemented unconsciously to block out all the uncertainty awaiting me? Finally, could it just be evidence of me changing on a permanent basis, and the night was a singular necessary step backwards to ensure the long lasting life does in fact become a reality.

Is that a light at the end of the tunnel I can see?

12th April 2015: Sydney, Australia

A continuation of feeling well seems to be building momentum. It has now been many days since a bout of nausea has been experienced with my energy stocks also seemingly not depleted. Consequently, I have been much more social, a feature eliciting a sense of normality into my life. In addition, I am going to sleep, basking in the comfort of my bed. An experience lost as long as memory allows. Admittedly, in the social arena my complete confidence is still lacking, particularly resulting from the unshifting Cancer narrative I seem bound within. My self-awareness reinforces the origins of the unshifting narrative directly stemming from my internal thought process, however, as previously mentioned, momentum feels to be building.

I would like to say the battle is coming to a close, and the last appointment with my Professor has only reinforced these feelings. Admittedly, I have long advocated for not setting timescales in regards to the length of my treatment, however, periods of happiness flow throughout my thoughts in relation to the approaching prospect of once again resuming what would be deemed a normal life. The corresponding challenge is to ensure the avenue adopted in achieving the state of wellness within my mind and body throughout the entirety of this process continues after the treatment ceases. It is undeniable that to the outside world the previous sentence would not necessarily be shared, however, personally regardless of the circumstances faced, I feel to have found a security within my self. A defining factor I wish continues and flourishes when the next stage of my life begins.

Future vision for work

4th March 2015: Sydney, Australia

Recently, I have been thinking about a model to base a private consulting practice upon. The idea consists of having two separate arms, targeting both people with Cancer and others in the community with varying concerns. The two populations would be served by two separate theories. Namely, the Sunflower Framework for people with Cancer and the MESA principles, another model I devised to work with young people or adults with any number of concerns. The separation caters to a wide range of the community, with an underlying theme connecting the two principles together.

Obviously, a lot more work is required to bring the idea to fruition, with advertising, the creation of a website and other factors to be considered, however, it seems a realistic, achievable and feasible option to explore when I am ready to renter the workforce. I understand the theory has not been explained, and is untested. Therefore, further focus and attention is required on the matter, including the undertaking of a process (peer reviews and consultations with other professionals/academics) similar to the efforts involved in launching the Sunflower Framework.

Further updates will be provided as and when attention is directed to the matter.

Am I drug addict or just reliant on drugs to survive?

25th February, 2015: Sydney Australia

Prior to sleeping last night, a chain of thinking brought to surface a reality in my life about a perceived reliance and newly formed rigidity resulting from the need for pills to be consumed at set intervals throughout the day.

Interestingly, a link to this perceived reliance stems to the corresponding period last year whereby the drug Endone, an opium based pain-relief medicine was essential in managing the period following my surgery. A number of vivid images come to mind when thinking of the time when I was taking Endone, most notably, the ability of the drug to quickly take away the intense throbbing pain associated with the weeping wound. For many weeks post discharge, a typical day would commence at approximately 3am whereby I would painfully reach over to the tablets next to my bed before going back to sleep. The next moment of pain were experienced in the morning when a dishevelled version of myself would be seen to walk upstairs with a sour look on my face. At the time, it seems the face signalled a chain of events to occur, starting with my mum immediately giving me the necessary pills whilst also starting a massage on my back to help reduce any pain. It should be noted that a husky grunt or groan were the only noises heard till I was able to verbally communicate. Usually, the primitive form of communication would last forty minutes till any sort of food would be considered, and just like now, planning would then centre around the timing for having my next set of pills whilst in complete contradiction a battle was ongoing in my mind based on timeframes for when I would no longer be taking any drugs.

I opt for the term reliance, due specifically to both a physical and mental need to consume my current prescription of drugs. Personal observations have brought to mind the switch when recognising I am late taking the pills. It is apparent a psychosomatic reaction is triggered, particularly in relation to the required dose of Cortisol. For instance, any sign of fatigue or nausea is always represented to be directly caused from not adhering to the scheduling of my tablets. Consequently, a sense of urgency rushes throughout my thinking till I have consumed the drugs. I do see some merit in my reaction, especially as my body only obtains the necessary Cortisol in an artificial form, however, I have difficulty accepting the concept of the seemingly adept ability of my body to perform at a usual level till it registers that I am late taking the dose, and that very knowledge places me in the position whereby I see my life revolving around a routine of drugs. A point I do not wish to feature for the rest of my life.